SPH.DGSOM.BWF Inter-schoolTrainingPrograminMetabolicDisease

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CO-DIRECTORS

Dr. Simin Liu

Dr. Liu is an epidemiologist whose work unites molecular genetics, nutrition, physiology and clinical medicine using epidemiologic principles and methodologies. He has conducted research into molecular and nutritional epidemiology of metabolic diseases in diverse human populations and nutritional supplements for disease prevention in clinical intervention studies. His original research reports number over 150, have been published in top-tier biomedical journals (including New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Diabetes, American Journal of Human Genetics, and American Journal of Clinical Nutrition), and are among the most-frequently cited.

Dr. Liu has been the principal investigator of multiple NIH-sponsored molecular epidemiological studies. He co-founded the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Inter-School Program in Metabolic Diseases at UCLA- a cross-disciplinary PhD training program aimed at educating scientists capable of integrating population-based quantitative disciplines with laboratory-based biological sciences. Dr. Liu is an elected fellow of the American Heart Association and has served on national and international advisory committees in medicine and public health.

Dr. Liu earned his medical degree from Jinan University Medical School in China and master of public health and doctoral degrees in both epidemiology and nutrition from Harvard University. He also completed a fellowship in epidemiology and preventive medicine in the Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Liu is currently Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology and Director of the Center for Metabolic Disease Prevention at University of California Los Angeles.

Dr. Tom Drake

Dr. Drake received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1977, and completed his residency and fellowship/research training in Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at UCSF in 1984. He has been at UCLA since then, in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, and is currently Professor and Vice-chair. Outside of his research activities, he is Co-chair of the "Foundations of Medicine I" course for 1st year students in the School of Medicine, and oversees outpatient laboratory services and information services for the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine.


ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Dr. Jonathan Braun

Dr. Braun, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, and Molecular and Medical Pharmacology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He is the Chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Director of Tumor Immunology at the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Co-Director of the UCLA Institute of Molecular Medicine (IMED). At UCLA, he directs the clinical programs in Pathology and Laboratory Medicine of UCLA Healthcare, and is co-director of the Instititute of Molecular Medicine (IMED) and the UCLA Clinical Translational Science Institute (CTSI).

Dr. Michael Goran

Dr. Goran is a Professor of Preventive Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics, and Pediatrics at the Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California. He is the Dr. Robert C and Veronica Atkins Endowed Chair in Childhood Obesity and Diabetes, and Director of the Center for Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer, and the Director of the Childhood Obesity Research Center. His research group has been studying the causes and consequences of childhood obesity for over 20 years.

Dr. Richard Jackson

Dr. Jackson obtained his M.D. from UCSF and his M.P.H. from UC Berkeley. He is currently Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at UCLA. In California, his work led to the establishment of the California Birth Defects Monitoring Program and state and national laws, which has helped to reduce risk from dangerous pesticides, especially for farm workers and children. He served in the highest California Public Health position where he advanced the states disease preparedness efforts and public health effort to reverse the obesity epidemic. In addition, Dr. Jackson was instrumental in the re-creation of the California Department of Public Health, separated from the insurance functions from the former Department of Health Services. He also brings with him 15 years of experience at the CDC where he established the National Asthma Epidemiology and Control Program, and advanced the childhood lead poisoning prevention program.

Dr. Ed McCabe

Dr. McCabe received his undergraduate education at Johns Hopkins University, and then earned a Ph.D. (1972) and an M.D. (1974) at the University of Southern California. As a Metabolism Fellow at the University of Colorado Health Science Center (UCHSC) and Professor at Baylor College of Medicine, he discovered Glycerol Kinase Deficiency, and proceeded to characterize the biochemical nature of this disorder and cloned the gene involved in Glycerol Kinase Deficiency and the gene for Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita. In 1994, he moved to UCLA as Professor and Executive Chair of the Department of Pediatrics and joined the Department of Human Genetics. Noting a lack of genotype/phenotype correlation for these single gene disorders, his research focuses on them as complex traits and explores the systems biology of each disorder.

Dr. Meir Stampfer

Dr. Stampfer’s research program is broadly concerned with the etiology of chronic diseases, with particular focus on nutrition, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. With colleagues in the Departments of Epidemiology and Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health, and at Channing Laboratory and the Division of Preventive Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dr. Stampfer is closely involved in four large prospective cohort studies: Nurses’ Health Study I and II, Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, and Physicians’ Health Studies I and II

In 2005, Dr. Stampfer was identified as the most highly cited scientist in the field of clinical medicine over the previous decade.

Dr. Alan Robinson

Alan Robinson, M.D. is Vice Provost of Medical Sciences and Executive Associate Dean of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA where he has focused on maintaining a high quality of research and medical education in the UCLA Medical Enterprise. Dr. Robinson has championed the use of multi-media technologies in medical education and research, and has helped make the entire first two-year curriculum available to students on the web. The School of Medicine consistently ranks in the top five medical schools in total research funding, and in the top 10 in NIH funding, which has nearly doubled to $220 million year during Dr. Robinson’s tenure. Dr. Robinson’s individual research activities include 25 years of funding from the NIH, an extensive publication record in endocrinology and many chapters in the standard textbooks of endocrinology and internal medicine.



STEERING COMMITTEE

Dr. Gautam Chaudhuri

Dr. Chaudhuri completed his M.D. from the All-India Institute of Medical Sciences, India, and then obtained a Ph.D. in Pharmacology from London University under the mentorship of Professor Sir John Vane, who won the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology in 1982. Following completion of his fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at UCLA, he joined the department as an Assistant Professor, and has thus done extensive work on the action of sex steroids and nitric oxide. He has served for 4 years as a member of the Human Embryology and Development Review Group of the NIH program project review groups, 4 years as a member of the Maternal and Child Health Committee of the NICHD, and was recently appointed as a member of the Advisory Council of the NICHD.

Dr. Roger Detels

Dr. Detels is currently Professor and former Chair of the Department of Epidemiology at the UCLA School of Public Health, and has been a faculty member of the Department of Epidemiology since 1971. Since 1984, Dr. Detels has been the Principal Investigator of the Los Angeles Center of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, one of the largest natural history studies of HIV/AIDS in the world. In addition, he serves as the Program Director of the National Institutes of Health UCLA/Fogarty AIDS International Training and Research Program and the Interdisciplinary Training in HIV/AIDS Epidemiology Program.

Dr. Gail Harrison

Dr. Harrison is a Professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences at the UCLA School of Public Health. She also serves as Associate Director of the Program for Healthy and At-Risk Populations in the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, UCLA/Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. Her research focuses on determinants, measurement, and functional consequences of nutrition, malnutrition, and food security, both in the U.S. and internationally. She has been a member of the Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) of the National Academy of Sciences/Institute of Medicine and several FNB committees, including the Committee on International Nutrition, the Committee to Review the Risk Criteria for the WIC Program, and the Committee on Implications of Dioxin in the Food Supply, and the Committee to Revise the WIC Food Packages. She has consulted with the World Health Organization and UNICEF, and has worked in Egypt, the Sudan, Iran, Indonesia, and Lesotho besides the U.S.

Dr. Kenneth Lange

Dr. Lange is Professor and Chair of Human Genetics and Professor of Biomathematics at the UCLA School of Medicine. At various times during his career, he has held appointments at the University of New Hampshire, MIT, Harvard University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Helsinki. His research interests include human genetics, population biology, biomedical imaging, computational statistics, and applied stochastic processes. In human genetics, he has continued work on problems of linkage mapping, risk prediction in genetic counseling, genetic epidemiology, and forensic uses of DNA fingerprinting; in the past few years, he has also studied quantitative issues surrounding gene mapping strategies such as radiation hybrids, sperm typing, and haplotype mapping.

Dr. Jake Lusis

After completing his Ph.D. in Biophysics, Dr. Lusis joined the faculty of UCLA as Professor of Medicine, Microbiology, and Molecular Genetics bringing with him a thorough interest in applying the tools of mouse genetics to cardiovascular diseases and other complex traits. His recent work has focused on approaches that integrate genetic segregation, complex trait phenotypes, and whole genome expression array analyses. Using such combined data, his research group has modeled biologic networks and made predictions about the involvement of novel genes in cardiovascular diseases.

Dr. Ren Sun

Dr. Sun is a Professor of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology and Associate Dean of Graduate Studies at UCLA. His research currently investigates the tumorigenic nature of herpesviruses, EBV and HHV-8 by integrating biology and nanotechnology to define the underlying mechanism to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

Dr. Qing Zhou

Dr. Zhou obtained his Ph.D. in Statistics from Harvard University and a BS in Engineering from Tsinghua University. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Statistics at UCLA. His research interests include using computational biology, Bayesian statics, and Monte Carlo methods to generate models and algorithms.


FACULTY

Laboratory Based

Dr. Arthur Arnold

Dr. Arnold completed his Ph.D. and post-doctoral study at the Rockefeller University in neurobiology and neuroanatomy and continues to study the biological origins of sex differences, especially in the brain. His lab has done extensive work on examining the direct and indirect effects of sex chromosome genes on the brain and other cells, and on the differences caused by X- and Y-linked genes. Dr. Arnold is presently a Professor of Physiological Science at UCLA.

Dr. Anthony Butch

Dr. Butch's clinical areas of responsibility are in the division of laboratory medicine including chemistry, toxicology, and immunochemistry. His research interests involve three areas of investigation: 1) Characterizing human follicular dendritic cell immunobiology and the role of follicular dendritic cells in regulating T cell responses in germinal centers; 2) Defining the role of germinal centers in the production of IgE allergic responses 3) Developing dendritic cell-based vaccines capable of generating in vivo anti-tumor cell responses to control minimal residual disease following conventional therapies. He is currently Director of the Clinical Immunology Research Laboratory and of Clinical Chemistry at UCLA, and Professor of Clinical Chemistry and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at UCLA.

Dr. Peter Butler

Dr. Butler's Dr. Peter Butler's research is focused on abnormal insulin secretion in diabetes, the causes of beta cell death in diabetes and the possibility to foster islet regeneration in humans with diabetes. At UCLA, he has established the Larry Hillblom Islet Research Center, a free standing building that houses investigators with a wide range of skills focused on revealing the mechanisms of beta cell loss and potential regeneration in people with type 1 and 2 diabetes. He is director of the LHIRC islet isolation and physiology core. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the journal Diabetes. He is also the Chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension. His clinical practice at UCLA focuses on care of patients with diabetes.

Dr. Gautam Chaudhuri

Dr. Chaudhuri completed his M.D. from the All-India Institute of Medical Sciences, India, and then obtained a Ph.D. in Pharmacology from London University under the mentorship of Professor Sir John Vane, who won the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology in 1982. Following completion of his fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at UCLA, he joined the department as an Assistant Professor, and has thus done extensive work on the action of sex steroids and nitric oxide. He has served for 4 years as a member of the Human Embryology and Development Review Group of the NIH program project review groups, 4 years as a member of the Maternal and Child Health Committee of the NICHD, and was recently appointed as a member of the Advisory Council of the NICHD.

Dr. Curtis Eckhert

Dr. Eckhert has been Chair of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences since 1998. He received his Ph.D. in biochemistry and nutrition from Cornell University (1974). Thereafter, he conducted postdoctoral research in neurochemistry (Cornell), trace element metabolism (UC Davis), and visual biochemistry (Stanford). He joined the faculty of UCLA in 1979 where he has worked on projects involving the toxicology and beneficial effects of selenium, riboflavin, and most recently the element boron.

Dr. Rita Effros

Rita B. Effros is an immunologist who has been at the UCLA School of Medicine since 1979. Dr. Effros earned her B.A. in Biology from Brandeis University, and her Ph.D. in Immunology from the University of Pennsylvania, under the mentorship of Peter Doherty, 1996 Nobel Laureate. In 2002 she was named to the Plott Endowed Chair in Gerontology, and in 2007, she was awarded the prestigious Kleemeier Award by the Geronological Society of America. Her research is focused on changes in the immune system during aging and HIV disease, specifically addressing the role of telomere/telomerase dynamics in the anti-viral function of T lymphocytes.

Dr. Alan Fogelman

Dr. Fogelman completed his M.D. and fellowship in cardiology at UCLA. He is currently an executive chair and Professor of Medicine at the Department of Medicine and Director of Atherosclerosis Research Unit at UCLA. His current research interests include the cell biology of the artery wall and lipid metabolism, growth factors, and heart valve disease.

Dr. Warren Grundfest

Dr. Warren S. Grundfest is the former Chair of Biomedical Engineering at UCLA where he holds appointments as Professor of Bioengineering, Electrical Engineering, and Surgery. He serves as the Senior West Coast Clinical Advisor and Portfolio Manager for Nanomedicine and Biomaterials for TATRC (the Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center of the U.S. Army). He serves as a Panel Member for several NIH Study Sections, and FDA and DoD review committees. He is one of the nation’s foremost experts on image-guided therapies and medical device development. His research interests include minimally invasive surgery, optical diagnostics, medical robotics, and advanced medical imaging technologies. Dr. Grundfest is a past President of IMBISPS, a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, the AIMBE, and SPIE. He holds 15 patents, has 5 more pending, has authored 200+ papers, and 46 book chapters. He has been involved with multiple corporate and venture technology development programs.

Dr. David Heber

Dr. Heber is the Director of the UCLA Center for Human Nutrition at the University of California Los Angeles, a Professor of Medicine and Public Health, the founding Chief of the Division of Clinical Nutrition in the Department of Medicine and the Founding Director of the UCLA Center for Human Nutrition at UCLA. He directs the NCI-funded Clinical Nutrition Research Unit and the NIH Nutrition and Obesity Training Grants at UCLA. Dr. Heber's primary areas of research are obesity treatment and prevention, the role of nutrition, phytochemicals,and botanical dietary supplements in the prevention and treatment of common forms of cancer and cardiovascular disease.

Dr. Harvey Herschman

Dr. Harvey Herschman received a B.A. from Rice University and a Ph.D. from the University of California at San Diego. He is currently a Distinguished Professor in both the Department of Biological Chemistry and the Department of Molecular and Medical pharmacology at UCLA, Director for Basic Research for the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Principal Investigator for the UCLA Ph.D. training grant in Research Training in Pharmacological Sciences (RTPS). Dr. Herschman's laboratory discovered the COX-2 gene, has been involved in studies on COX-2 induction, and in investigations of the role of COX-2 in normal biology and in the pathophysiologies of inflammation, neurodegeneration and cancer. He has also pioneered in the development and application of non-invasive, repeated and quantitative methods for molecular imaging of gene expression in living animals, and is the Director of UCLA's In Vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging Center, funded by the National Cancer Institute.

Dr. Andrea Hevener

Dr. Hevener completed her Ph.D. at the University of Southern California and her fellowship in Endocrinology and Metabolism at the University of California, San Diego. She has done extensive work on studying the causal mechanisms of insulin resistance and identification of viable drug targets for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, is also highly involved in research on transcriptional regulators of inflammation, adiposity and insulin action, estrogen action / ERa regulation of metabolism and insulin sensitivity, metabolic syndrome and disease susceptibility (diabetes, atherosclerosis, cancer), and skeletal muscle metabolism, energetics and function. She currently is an Adjunct Assistant Professor for the UCLA Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Hypertension at UCLA.

Dr. Mo Kang

Dr. Kang is an Associate Professor at the UCLA School of Dentistry. He received a BS and MS in Biochemistry, a Ph.D. in Oral Biology and Medicine, and a DDS from UCLA. Dr. Kang's current research focuses on oral mucosal diseases, including oral cancer, chemical and radiation-induced oral mucositis and aging associated oral epithelial dysfunction.

Dr. Kenneth Lange

Dr. Lange is Professor and Chair of Human Genetics and Professor of Biomathematics at the UCLA School of Medicine. At various times during his career, he has held appointments at the University of New Hampshire, MIT, Harvard University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Helsinki. His research interests include human genetics, population biology, biomedical imaging, computational statistics, and applied stochastic processes. In human genetics, he has continued work on problems of linkage mapping, risk prediction in genetic counseling, genetic epidemiology, and forensic uses of DNA fingerprinting; in the past few years, he has also studied quantitative issues surrounding gene mapping strategies such as radiation hybrids, sperm typing, and haplotype mapping.

Dr. Xinmin Li

Dr. Li joined the UCLA faculty in 2007 as Professor of genomics. His research focuses on the identification and characterization of genetic variations that affect complex diseases. He uses an integrated genomic approach to investigate global mRNA/miRNA expression, copy number variation, single nucleotide polymorphism and DNA-protein interaction by primarily using microarray-based technologies for initial screening and siRNA/miRNA-mediated technologies for functional screening. His ultimate goal is to identify genetic variations of clinical importance.

Dr. Joseph Loo

Professor Loo received his B.S. in Chemistry from Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY in 1982 and his Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry in 1988 from Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. Dr. Loo is currently a Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. The research interests of Professor Loo’s group include the development and application of bioanalytical methods for the structural characterization of proteins and post-translational modifications, proteomics-based research, and the elucidation of protein biomarkers of disease.

Dr. Jake Lusis

After completing his Ph.D. in Biophysics, Dr. Lusis joined the faculty of UCLA as Professor of Medicine, Microbiology, and Molecular Genetics bringing with him a thorough interest in applying the tools of mouse genetics to cardiovascular diseases and other complex traits. His recent work has focused on approaches that integrate genetic segregation, complex trait phenotypes, and whole genome expression array analyses. Using such combined data, his research group has modeled biologic networks and made predictions about the involvement of novel genes in cardiovascular diseases.

Dr. Ed McCabe

Dr. McCabe received his undergraduate education at Johns Hopkins University, and then earned a Ph.D. (1972) and an M.D. (1974) at the University of Southern California. As a Metabolism Fellow at the University of Colorado Health Science Center (UCHSC) and Professor at Baylor College of Medicine, he discovered Glycerol Kinase Deficiency, and proceeded to characterize the biochemical nature of this disorder and cloned the gene involved in Glycerol Kinase Deficiency and the gene for Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita. In 1994, he moved to UCLA as Professor and Executive Chair of the Department of Pediatrics and joined the Department of Human Genetics. Noting a lack of genotype/phenotype correlation for these single gene disorders, his research focuses on them as complex traits and explores the systems biology of each disorder.

Dr. Lauren Nathan

Dr. Nathan received her medical degree from Duke University and practices medicine at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. She is also a Women's Health Initiative investigator at the UCLA Clinical Center.

Dr. Paivi Pajukanta

Dr. Pajukanta is an Associate Professor in the Department of Human Genetics at UCLA. She has investigated the genetic background of several complex traits predisposing individuals to coronary heart disease such as familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCHL), low HDL-cholesterol, and obesity. She is especially interested in combining molecular genetic approaches with new statistical and bioinformatics tools to identify and characterize DNA sequence variants contributing to common cardiovascular disorders.

Dr. Jeanette Papp

Dr. Papp is the Director of the UCLA Genotyping and Sequencing Core Facility, and a member of the Bioinformatics Group in the Department of Human Genetics. In addition to overseeing data generation and analysis in her laboratory, Dr. Papp's research interests include developing novel bioinformatic solutions for the management and analysis of all types of genetic data.

Dr. Jian Yu Rao

Dr. Jian Yu Rao is Associate Professor of Pathology and Epidemiology at UCLA. He is a surgical pathologist and cytopathologist specializing in genitourinary tract and gynecological pathology, as well as a molecular epidemiologist and cancer cell biologist. After becoming faculty at Department of Pathology and Lab Med in 1999, he has since been named the Director of cytopathology research. Dr. Rao's research interests include developing tools for cancer screening, early detection, and therapeutic monitoring.

Dr. Wendie Robbins

Dr. Robbins is an Associate Professor in the School of Nursing and School of Public Health at UCLA and Biolaboratory Core Director for the UCLA Center for Vunerable Populations Research. She earned a B.S. in Nursing from Arizona State University (1978), M.S. in Nursing from the University of Arizona (1981), and a Ph.D. in Epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley (1994). Her research interests include biomarkers used in epidemiologic studies of reproductive/offspring health (development, application, and evaluation of biomarkers); reproductive and environmental epidemiology; germ cell mutagenesis; gene environment interactions; and community-based participatory research.

Dr. Christian Roberts

Dr. Roberts is Associate Professor in the Department of Physiological Science at UCLA. Recently, Dr. Roberts was named the recipient of a Beginning Grant-in-Aid from the American Heart Association, Western States Affiliate to investigate the effects of resistance training on cardiovascular disease risk. His main research interest includes the study of the mechanisms by which exercise and diet are protective against cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Dr. Leonard Rome

Dr. Rome is Professor in the Department of Biological Chemistry and Senior Associate Dean for Research in the School of Medicine. He earned his B.S. in Chemistry and M.S. and Ph.D. in Biological Chemistry at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Since becoming Senior Associate Dean for Research, he has organized a strategic plan for research in UCLA School of Medicine and spearheaded campus-wide efforts in genomics, proteomics, and computational biology. His laboratory research centers on a novel cellular organelle called a "vault", which was discovered in his laboratory. He is presently organizing a Nanoscience Interdisciplinnary Research Team, a collaboration with professionals from various disciplines including cell biologists, engineers, chemists, and structural biologists who will engineer vaults so that they may one day be used in drug delivery and as components of nano-electrical machines.

Dr. Robert Schiestl

Dr. Schiestl is Professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, and Department of Radiation Oncology. His work focuses on basic mechanisms, genetic control, and inducibility by carcinogens of homologous and illegitimate recombination, as well as molecular events involved in carcinogenesis.

Dr. Peter Tontonoz

Dr. Tontonoz is Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and a member of the Molecular Biology Institute at UCLA. He received his undergraduate degree in molecular biology and biochemistry from Wesleyan University and his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard Medical School. Dr. Tontonoz studies the regulation of gene expression by nuclear receptors and the relationship of these signaling pathways to human diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis.

Dr. Xia Yang is Assistant Professor of Integrative Biology and Physiology. She earned her Ph.D. in Molecular Genetics with an emphasis on Bioinformatics and eight years of training and working experience in integrative genomics and systems biology. Her research focuses on dissecting the molecular mechanisms and exploring novel targets/biomarkers for complex human metabolic disorders using integrative genomics and systems biology approaches that leverage genetics (including GWAS), gene expression, epigenetics, pathways, and networks.

Population Based

Dr. Roshan Bastani

Dr. Bastani is Professor of Health Services and Associate Dean for Research in the School of Public Health, and is Co-Director of its Center to Eliminate Health Disparities. She is also the Associate Director of the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control Research, the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, and the director of an NCI funded training grant, which prepares postdoctoral fellows (Ph.D. and M.D.) to conduct interdisciplinary cancer prevention and control research. Her main research interest is the study of access to health care among low-income, ethnic minority, and other underserved groups, with focus on testing the efficacy of patient and health care system directed interventions to improve access.

Dr. Julie Bower

Dr. Bower’s research focuses broadly on mind-body interactions among individuals confronting stressful life events, particularly diagnosis with life-threatening illnesses such as cancer. One area of her research examines how positive psychological factors, such as benefit finding, positive affect, and goal engagement, influence physical health, with a focus on the biological pathways that link positive psychological states and health outcomes. Another line of research examines immune effects on mood and behavior, including fatigue, depression, and sleep disturbance. Dr. Bower also conducts mind-body interventions (i.e., yoga, Tai Chi, and mindfulness meditation) with a focus on how these treatments influence immune and neuroendocrine function. Dr. Bower is associated with the Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology and the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control Research at UCLA and provides trainees with didactic and research training in these areas.

Dr. Richard Brown

Dr. Brown is the Director of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and Professor in the Department of Health Services and the Department of Community Health Sciences in the UCLA School of Public Health. He received his PhD in sociology of education from the University of California, Berkeley. His research and publications focus on health insurance coverage, the lack of coverage, and the effects on access of public policies and economic and market conditions, which have been used by California's governors, legislative leaders, and advocates in crafting health care legislation, policies and programs. Brown also has been extensively involved in the analysis and development of public policies, with particular emphasis on national health care reform. He has served as a senior health policy advisor to the Barack Obama for President Campaign, as health policy advisor to three members of the United States Senate, and as a full-time senior consultant to the President's Task Force on National Health Care Reform.

Dr. Cameron Campbell

Cameron Campbell is Professor of Sociology at UCLA. His research focuses on the relationships between inequality, family organization, and demographic behavior. He has published extensively on family and population in eighteenth and nineteenth century northeast China, most notably the book Fate and Fortune in Rural China with James Lee. He is currently working on a study of interactions between kinship, inequality, and demographic behavior in northeast China from the seventeenth century to the present. His honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship awarded in 2004, and an Award for Outstanding Book on Asia for Life Under Pressure from the American Sociological Association Section on Asia and Asian America.

Dr. Rita Cantor

Dr. Cantor is Professor in Residence of Human Genetics at UCLA. As a statistical geneticist, she is involved in multiple projects for mapping and identifying complex disease genes in humans. She exploits genome linkage scans, mouse/human synteny, and linkage disequilibrium patterns of SNPs and microsatellite markers in studying diseases as diverse as familial combined hyperlipidemia, lupus, autism, and Kawasaki disease.

Dr. Roger Detels

Dr. Detels is currently Professor and former Chair of the Department of Epidemiology at the UCLA School of Public Health, and has been a faculty member of the Department of Epidemiology since 1971. Since 1984, Dr. Detels has been the Principal Investigator of the Los Angeles Center of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, one of the largest natural history studies of HIV/AIDS in the world. In addition, he serves as the Program Director of the National Institutes of Health UCLA/Fogarty AIDS International Training and Research Program and the Interdisciplinary Training in HIV/AIDS Epidemiology Program.

Dr. David Elashoff

Dr. Elashoff is an Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Search at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, as well as an Adjunct Associate Professor of Biostatistics. He completed his Ph.D. in Statistics from Stanford University in 2000. His primary research interests are in the area of statistical genetics. He is currently working on statistical issues in the analysis of microarray data.

Dr. Eleazar Eskin

Dr. Eskin is an Assistant Professor in the Computer Science and Human Genetics departments at the University of California Los Angeles, is highly involved in the UCLA Interdepartmental Bioinformatics Ph.D. Program, and affiliated with Cal-IT2. Prior to UCLA, Dr. Eskin was an Assistant Professor in Residence in Computer Science Engineering at the University of California, San Diego and a post doc at Hebrew University in the Computer Science Department under the supervision of Yoram Singer and Nir Friedman. His current research focuses on developing techniques for solving the challenging computational problems that arise in attempting to understand the genetic basis of human disease.

Dr. Sander Greenland

Dr. Greenland is Professor of Epidemiology, UCLA School of Public Health, and Professor of Statistics, UCLA College of Letters and Science. He completed his M.S. and Dr.P.H. in Public Health and Epidemiology from UCLA School of Public Health. Dr. Greenland is considered a leading authority on quantitative methods and statistical theory in epidemiology, and is the co-author of Modern Epidemiology, 3rd edition. His current research interests include epidemiologic methodology, statistical methods for epidemiologic data, epidemiologic assessment of medicines and medical technology, and foundations of nonexperimental inference.

Dr. Steve Horvath

Dr. Horvath is an Associate Professor in Human Genetics and Biostatistics at UCLA, and is heading the Array Data Analysis Group (ADAG) at UCLA. He earned a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and Sc.D. in Biostatistics from Harvard. His research interests include a) gene networks, systems biology b) allelic association tests for mapping complex disease genes based on genetic markers c) data mining methods. He is one of the authors of the widely used software package (FBAT). His research in data mining focuses on supervised and unsupervised methods for analyzing microarray data.

Dr. Richard Jackson

Dr. Jackson obtained his M.D. from UCSF and his M.P.H. from UC Berkeley. He is currently Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at UCLA. In California, his work led to the establishment of the California Birth Defects Monitoring Program and state and national laws, which has helped to reduce risk from dangerous pesticides, especially for farm workers and children. He served in the highest California Public Health position where he advanced the states disease preparedness efforts and public health effort to reverse the obesity epidemic. In addition he was instrumental in the re-creation of the California Department of Public Health, separated from the insurance functions from the former Department of Health Services. He also brings with him 15 years of experience at the CDC where he established the National Asthma Epidemiology and Control Program and advanced the childhood lead poisoning prevention program.

Dr. Marjorie Kagawa-Singer

Dr. Kagawa-Singer is a Professor at the UCLA School of Public Health and Department of Asian American Studies. She has a masters in nursing degree from UCLA School of Nursing, as well as a master degree and PhD in anthropology from UCLA. Presently her research focuses on improving the science of health disparities research and reducing disparities in health outcomes for populations of color, especially Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders. Kagawa-Singer is the Director of the Concurrent Degree Program Community Health Sciences and Asian American Studies and the Principal Investigator at the UCLA Minority Training Program for Cancer Control Research. She is also the Associate Director of the UCLA Lance Armstrong Center of Excellence for Cancer Survivorship.

Dr. Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh

Dr. Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh is a Professor of Medicine, Pediatrics and Epidemiology at UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine and UCLA School of Public Health, and Director of the Dialysis Expansion Program at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Southern California. He received his MD from the University of Bonn in Germany, a doctorate from University of Erlangen-Nuremberg in Germany, and a Master’s degree in Public Health (MPH) and a PhD in epidemiology from University of California in Berkeley. Dr. Kalantar-Zadeh has authored or coauthored more than 200 peer-reviewed articles, 12 book chapters and over 300 scientific abstracts (see PubMed or Google Scholar for list of publications. His research interests include cardiovascular and nutritional risk factors and disparities in patients with kidney disease, malnutrition, inflammation, cachexia and wasting disorders, osteodystrophy, mineral disarrays, dietary phosphorus, vitamin deficiencies, hyponatremia, anemia, iron deficiency, diabetes, obesity, and acid-base homeostasis.

Dr. Vikram Kamdar

Dr. Kamdar received his MD from University of Bombay, India, in 1971. He completed both his internship and residencies at KEM Hospital in Bombay, and was a fellow in Endocrinology at Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles. His latest appointment was with USC as Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. Dr. Kamdar’s clinical research interests are in diabetes mellitus, lipid disorders, drug evaluations, coronary risk factors in South Asian population, and the prevention of diabetes.

Dr. Cathy C. Lee

Dr. Lee is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at UCLA. She is also a research scientist at the Greater Los Angeles VA Geriatrics, Research, Education and Clinical Center (GRECC). She earned a B.S. in Biology/Music from Union College, M.D. from Albany Medical College, and M.S. in Clinical Research Design and Statistical Analysis from the University of Michigan, where she also completed her Geriatrics fellowship training. Her research interests include clinical research involving the age-associated changes in sex hormone levels and how that impacts diabetes risk, insulin resistance and obesity.

Dr. Gang Li

Dr. Li is currently a Professor of Biostatistics in the UCLA School of Public Health. He completed his M.S. and Ph.D. in Statistics from Florida State University. He is currently conducting research in the area of developing statistical methods for clinical trial analyses and epidemiologic studies in which the time to an event is the primary outcome. He has expertise in nonparametric regression, model selection, nonparametric and semiparametric likelihood ratio based inference, two-sample problems, and bootstrap for censored, truncated, and biased data. Recently, he has been studying resampling methods in nonparametric censored regression, as well as working on semiparametric estimation of survival probabilities for incomplete cross-sectional data which arise frequently in prevalent cohort studies.

Dr. Leo Morales

Dr. Morales is an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Services and the Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research in the Department of Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine. He is also an affiliated staff member of RAND Health, Santa Monica, California. Dr. Morales received his M.D. at the University of Washington and his Ph.D. in Policy Studies at the Frederick S. Pardee RAND Graduate School. His research interests include minority health, disparities in health care and psychometrics. He is a past recipient of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Harold Amos Award. Dr. Morales is the current recipient of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Investigator Award and a Russell Sage Foundation Award to study the effects of acculturation to the United States on the health of Mexican immigrants.

Dr. Jorn Olsen

Dr. Olsen is currently Chair and Professor of the Department of Epidemiology at UCLA’s School of Public Health. He earned his M.D. and Ph.D. from the University of Aarhus and has been highly involved in research at the Danish Epidemiology Science Centre and the Danish Pregnancy Cohort, focusing on prenatal exposures on behavioral problems and brain disorders in children. He is also interested in studying prenatal nutrition, stress and infection during pregnancy, and use of medicines during pregnancy on children’s health and development.

Dr. Alex Ortega

Dr. Ortega is Professor of Public Health and Psychiatry & Bio-behavioral Sciences at UCLA, and he is Director and Principal Investigator of the UCLA Center for Population Health and Health Disparities, a $10 million, 5 year-effort funded by the National Heart, Lung & Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study and reduce cardiovascular disease risk in East Los Angeles, California. He is also affiliated with the UCLA Centers for Healthier Children, Families and Communities and Culture and Health.

Dr. Isidro B. Salusky

Dr. Salusky is Professor of Pediatrics at UCLA School of Medicine, Program Director of the UCLA General Clinic Research Center, and Director of the Pediatric Dialysis Program. Dr. Salusky earned his M.D. from the National University of Buenos Aires and completed his residency at Dr. Pedro de Elizalde Hospital in Buenos Aires. He completed a Pediatric Nephrology fellowship at Hospital des Enfants Malade in Paris, an advanced Research fellowship in Nutritional Metabolism at V.A. Wadsworth Medical Center in Los Angeles, and a Pediatric Nephrology fellowship at UCLA School of Medicine. Dr. Salusky was a Vice-Chair for the KDOQI Pediatric Guidelines, published by the National Kidney Foundation. His interests include growth and nutrition in children with renal failure.

Dr. Janet Sinsheimer

Dr. Sinsheimer is Professor of Biostatistics, Biomathematics, and Human Genetics at UCLA. She earned a Ph.D. in Biostatistics from UCLA. Her research interests include work on Bayesian techniques for reconstructing evolutionary trees from molecular data, application of these phylogenetic methods to determining the rate of evolution of HIV, to the clinical identification of microbial pathogens, and to understanding the genes determining sex in mammals. She is also deeply involved in statistical genetics, both at the theoretical and practical levels. She is a co-developer of the gamete competition model and a statistical collaborator on studies of osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism, and schizophrenia.

Dr. Eric Sobel

Eric Sobel received his PhD from the UCLA Department of Biomathematics in 1996. One of his research interests is developing efficient methods using Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques to mine the data stored in large family histories. The software he has developed is widely used to help locate the genes that contribute to diseases ranging from rare hereditary traits such as Ataxia-Telangiectasia to complex common traits such as migraine and diabetes.

Dr. Marc Suchard

Dr. Suchard is Associate Professor of Biomathematics at UCLA. His group's research interest focuses on developing the nascent field of evolutionary medicine. To bridge the gap between phylogenetics and human-pathogen biology, Dr. Suchard studies the development of novel reconstruction methods drawing heavily on statistical, mathematical, and computation techniques. Some of his current projects involve jointly estimating alignments and phylogenies from molecular sequence data and mapping recombination hot-spots in the HIV genome.

Dr. May Wang

Dr. Wang is a nutritional epidemiologist and public health nutritionist. Her research revolves around: (1) the development of culturally appropriate diet assessment methodologies for diverse groups including Latino and Asian Americans (2) the investigation of social disparities in nutrition and health with a focus on neighborhood environmental influences on diet, physical activity, childhood obesity and pediatric bone health (3) the evaluation of child obesity prevention, school nutrition, and other child focused nutrition-related intervention programs. She is currently leading an evaluation of the School Lunch Initiative of the Berkeley Unified School District.

Dr. Yingnian Wu

Dr. Wu obtained his Ph.D. in Statistics at Harvard. He is now a Professor in the Department of Statistics at UCLA. His main research interests are statistical modeling and computing.

Dr. Antronette Yancey

Dr. Yancey is a professor in the Department of Health Services, UCLA School of Public Health. She completed her M.D. at Duke, and her preventive medicine residency and MPH at UCLA. Her primary research is in chronic disease prevention and adolescent health promotion. She returned to academia full-time in 2001 after five years in public health practice, first as Director of Public Health for the city of Richmond, VA, and, until recently, as Director of Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Los Angeles County Department of Health Services. She serves on the Advisory Committee to the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Dr. Julie Gerberding), Institute of Medicine (IOM) Progress in Preventing Childhood Obesity Committee and Health Literacy Roundtable, American Heart Association Physical Activity Sub-committee, and Board of Directors, Public Health Institute.

Dr. Zuo-Feng Zhang

Dr. Zhang is Professor of Epidemiology, and Director of UCLA-USC Molecular Epidemiology Training Program at University of California, Los Angeles. As a cancer molecular epidemiologist, Dr. Zhang has studied gene-environment interactions on the risk of a variety of cancers. His main focus is on cigarette smoking and TP53 gene mutations on the risk of bladder cancer, marijuana smoking and mutagen sensitivity on the risk of head and neck cancer, green tea drinking and H. Pylori infection on the risk of stomach cancer, tobacco smoking and phases I and II as well as DNA repair genes on the risk of lung cancer, alcohol drinking and susceptibility genes on the risk of esophageal cancer. Dr. Zhang is also interested in nutrition and cancer, epidemiology of second primary cancers, methodological issues in the use of tumor markers in cancer epidemiology, and the application of tumor markers in progression and survival of cancer.

Dr. Qing Zhou

Dr. Zhou obtained his Ph.D. in Statistics from Harvard University and a BS in Engineering from Tsinghua University. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Statistics at UCLA. His research interests include using computational biology, Bayesian statics, and Monte Carlo methods to generate models and algorithms.

Dr. Shen Hu

Dr. Hu is an assistant professor in the Division of Oral Biology and Medicine at the UCLA School of Dentistry. Dr. Hu has been studying Sjögren's syndrome (SS) for more than six years, with a research focus on discovery of molecular determinants underlying the disease mechanisms and targeted therapeutics for SS treatment. He also focused on proteomics and cancer stem cells in oral and pancreatic cancer. His membership in the campus-wide organizations such as the UCLA Proteomics Initiative, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and Dental Research Institute assure that the assembled research team will have access to a wide range of research resources.